Ramifications of short-term meteorological variability on elevational range size

Cho-ying Huang Associate Professor / Department of geological Ramifications of short-term meteorological variability on elevational range size   Spatial distributions of fauna are sensitive to climate variabilities. Classic ecological hypotheses have all suggested that greater seasonal climatic fluctuations will result in a wider species geographic distribution. These were proposed about a half century ago and have been heavily tested through the years. However, animals experience not only seasonal climatic but diurnal meteorological dynamics, and the latter one has rarely been addressed and investigated. A collaborative study led by Wei-Ping Chan…

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How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?

Min-Hui Lo Assistant professor / Department of Atmospheric Sciences “How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?“ Min-Hui Lo Rising sea level is a threat to people who live near the coastal regions and in small islands; hence, accurately projecting rates of sea level rise is important, especially under climate changes. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution. Future projections of increasing reliance on groundwater suggests that GWD will become the most important singular terrestrial contribution to sea level rise over…

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Fishing causes age/size truncation and drives marine fishes to aggregate in space, elevating ecosystem risk

Chih-hao Hsieh Professor / Institute of Oceanography   Fishing causes age/size truncation and drives marine fishes to aggregate in space, elevating ecosystem risk   A population usually does not uniformly distribute in space. Previous studies have found that when a population is getting larger, the variance of the population abundance over a space (i.e., aggregation degree) will also be increasing. This mean-variance relationship is the well-known Taylor’s power law (V=aMb). The exponent b in Taylor’s power law is an indicator of the “aggregation potential” of a species. That is, for…

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A decade of sea level rise slowed by climate-driven hydrology

Min-Hui Lo Assistant professor / Department of Atmospheric Sciences "A decade of sea level rise slowed by climate-driven hydrology“ J. T. Reager, A. S. Gardner, J. S. Famiglietti, D. N. Wiese, A. Eicker, M.-H. Lo. While the ice sheets and mountain glaciers continue melting, changes in climate over the past decade have led to Earth’s continents to store an extra 3.2 trillion tons of water in land (over soils, lakes and underground aquifers), temporarily lowering the rate of sea level rise by about 20% that is called “climate-driven sea level…

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Assistant Professor Haojia Ren, with collaborators from the US, publishes several new studies in Nature, challenging the effects of iron fertilization on climate and the ocean

Haojia Ren Assistant professor / Department of Geoscience Assistant Professor Haojia Ren with collaborators from US publishing new study in Nature challenging the effect of iron fertilization on the global ocean and climate Dr. Haojia Ren, the assistant professor at Department of Geoscience, National Taiwan University, has been collaborating with researchers from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University in the US, to test whether iron fertilization during the last ice age drives plankton growth in the equatorial Pacific and eventually leading to the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.…

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Synergistic effects of predator and prey size diversity on trophic transfer efficiency in ocean ecosystems

Chih-hao Hsieh Professor / Institute of Oceanography Synergistic effects of predator and prey size diversity on trophic transfer efficiency in ocean ecosystems   Carmen García-Comas and Chih-hao Hsieh Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University   A group of scientists from the Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, led by Dr. Carmen García-Comas and Prof. Chih-hao Hsieh, demonstrate that the interaction of predator and prey size diversities affects trophic transfer efficiency in marine plankton. This is the first study to analyze individual size structure at two trophic levels in plankton, and…

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Dynamics of tropical rainfall belt in the western Pacific over the past 282 thousand years

Chuan-Chou Shen Professor / Department of Geosciences Dynamics of tropical rainfall belt in the western Pacific over the past 282 thousand years The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the most important realm for global ecosystem and human population, encompasses the heaviest tropical seasonal rain belt on Earth. Due to its intensive rainfall gradient, a small displacement can cause dramatic changes in hydroclimate. Being the corresponding author, Dr. Chuan-Chou Shen, a Distinguished Professor of the Department of Geosciences, and his team published their newest research results in the internationally renowned journal “Nature…

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Prominent studies by NTU Department of Geosciences research team led by Prof. Chuan-Chou Shen published in prestigious journal “Nature Communications”

Chuan-Chou Shen Professor / Department of Geosciences Super earthquakes over the past 4,000 years in the western Solomon Islands Renowned Journal "Nature Communications" published the top notch studies of NTU geological research team Super strong earthquakes could claim the lives of countless people just in minutes. Dr. Chuan-Chou Shen, a Distinguished Professor of the Department of Geology, National Taiwan University (NTU), collaborated with Professor Fred Taylor of the University of Taxis (UT) at Austin and published their newest research results in the internationally renowned journal “Nature Communications” on June 30.…

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Scientists of National Taiwan University develop a new ecological theory to use individual size distribution as biological indicators for foodweb complexity

Chih-hao Hsieh Associate Professor / Institute of Oceanography Scientists of National Taiwan University develop a new ecological theory to use individual size distribution as biological indicators for foodweb complexity “The big eat the small” is one of the most well-known ecological principles in aquatic ecosystems. Following this principle, together with energy loss during trophic transfer, a famous trophic pyramid is established; that is, the abundance of small organisms (e.g. small fishes) should be higher than that of large ones (e.g. large fishes). More specifically, the individual abundances decrease gradually as…

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Linking Genome and Biodiversity to Ecosystem

Takeshi Miki Associate Professor / Institute of Oceanography Linking Genome and Biodiversity to Ecosystem Associate Professor, Takeshi Miki from Institute of Oceanography with an international team proposed a novel approach to assess the functional redundancy of ecosystem and the importance of biodiversity. This proposed novel approach, linking whole genomic information of diverse microbes into complexity and multidimensionality of ecosystem functioning, can give an index to assess functional redundancy of ecosystem. The collaborators in Japan (Prof. Taichi Yokokawa in Ehime University and Prof. Kazuaki Matsui in Kinki University) leaded the microcosm…

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